Bob or Man on Boat Markus has a remarkable ability to strip life down to its basics to the point where the metaphors we manufacture as the looking glass for our existence end up standing in for existence itself Fish m

  • Title: Bob, or Man on Boat
  • Author: Peter Markus
  • ISBN: 9780979312335
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • Markus has a remarkable ability to strip life down to its basics, to the point where the metaphors we manufacture as the looking glass for our existence end up standing in for existence itself Fish, mud, night and river come to stand in place of family connections as fathers and sons, by giving themselves to fishing give themselves over to a lone search and to loss Bri Markus has a remarkable ability to strip life down to its basics, to the point where the metaphors we manufacture as the looking glass for our existence end up standing in for existence itself Fish, mud, night and river come to stand in place of family connections as fathers and sons, by giving themselves to fishing give themselves over to a lone search and to loss Brian Evenson, author of The Open CurtainPeter Markus has published three story collections and lives in Michigan.

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      Posted by:Peter Markus
      Published :2020-05-09T10:01:14+00:00

    About “Peter Markus

    1. Peter Markus says:

      Peter Markus is the author of a novel, Bob, or Man on Boat, as well as five other books of fiction, the most recent of which is The Fish and the Not Fish, a Michigan Notable Book of 2015 His fiction has appeared widely in anthologies and journals including Chicago Review, Iowa Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Black Warrior Review, Quarterly West, Massachusetts Review, Northwest Review, among many others He was awarded a Kresge Arts in Detroit fellowship in 2012 and has taught for 20 years as a writer in residence with the InsideOut Literary Arts Project.



    2 thoughts on “Bob, or Man on Boat

    1. This is transcendent music, a 133 page song of incredible beauty from America’s preeminent poet of earthly and heavenly matter. No other writer can make from mud and river and fish and moon the luminous world Markus paints here in this story of a father and son fishing on the river. Open the book anywhere and you will find the spare and haunting prose Markus has become renowned for:"I once saw Bob, at dawn, standing up in his boat, facing where the sun was rising, and what Bob was doing, it lo [...]

    2. one thing about lists, as sorrentino and warhol and now markus have taught us, is that they need never end (or begin), that they point endlessly. we trust an incantation—-that repetitive chanting—-in part because of its self-impoverished language. thus markus' song, in this moving, incantatory first novel, is not maximal or prolific; he gets away with only talking about fish and mud and brothers and fathers and sons because he talks only of them, doesn't talk about them for long (though he p [...]

    3. This is a novel of fathers and sons and fish, a novel in which sometimes the fathers are fish, sometimes the sons are fish, and sometimes the fish are stars. It's the story of Bob. Well, truthfully, it's the story of many Bobs—a chain of Bobs, of fathers and sons, and the spaces between them. The sons are always trying to catch their fathers, just as the fathers are trying to catch a fish, whether that fish is a real fish or that fish is their own father.The constant seeking and hoping is evoc [...]

    4. That night, up in the sky, Bob did not notice if there were any stars. Bob was too busy looking down, into the river, looking out across the river, to see if there were any stars. What Bob was looking for, looking down into the river, looking out across the river, was that leaping fish. Bob did not see, that night, that leaping-up-out-of-the-river fish. What Bob did see, in the river, that night, was the light of the moon. The moon, that night, it was as big, it was as full, as the moon can get. [...]

    5. I was curious (and perhaps a bit skeptical) how Peter Markus' unique voice might adjust to a longer format. In some ways Bob, or Man on Boat, reminds me of The Song of Hiawatha, but where Longfellow adopted strict meter to represent the campfire drumbeats of the northwood, Markus' less formal rhythmic layers flow across the pages in the contour of the river they describe. To read Bob is to touch the ages.

    6. Another solid effort from Dzanc. I won't bother with plot summary here, but I especially liked how Markus draws attention to certain words and the way they're used--"fish," for instance. His paragraph and sentence structure varies from the norm as well. The story's somewhat compelling--it reminded me of João Guimarães Rosa's "The Third Bank of the River" in certain respects--though not quite enough for me to be enthralled.

    7. Peter Markus has a way with rhythm, syntax, and unadorned language that, when combined in his hands, form dense narratives all at once mythical, brutal, beauteous, and deeply touching. I read this title after reading WE MAKE MUD, and I loved the ways in which the two share a sense of connectivity while managing to work wholly independently of one another.

    8. Totally awesome idea, awesome voice and syntactical inversions that made me laugh out loud with delight. Also all the elements of a good story make this a good story, like father searching for father searching for fish. It felt a little sloppy in the repetition though. I'm surprised by that and sometimes I was frustrated by it.

    9. Thematically like Old Man and the Sea meets Moby Dick, set in a grimy southeastern Michigan fishing town. Atmospheric and enthralling. The obsessiveness of both the narrator and his subject is mesmerizing.

    10. What I learned from this book is how much you can do with just a few words. Markus keeps repeating the same ones over and over. It's an incantatory effect. One feels transported to some Melvillian world. Peter Markus is a Melvillain.

    11. You don't have to say a lot. You just have to say what is necessary. This book does that better than most.

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