Stories from a Tearoom Window Lore and Legends of the Japanese Tea Ceremony The Japanese tea ceremony blends art with nature and has for centuries brought harmony to the daily life of its practitioners Stories From a Tearoom Window is a timeless collection of tales of the anc

  • Title: Stories from a Tearoom Window: Lore and Legends of the Japanese Tea Ceremony
  • Author: Chikamatsu Monzaemon Toshiko Mori Shigenori Chikmatsu Kozaburo Mori
  • ISBN: 9784805310632
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Japanese tea ceremony blends art with nature and has for centuries brought harmony to the daily life of its practitioners.Stories From a Tearoom Window is a timeless collection of tales of the ancient tea sages, compiled in the eighteenth century Both longtime adherents and newcomers to the tea ceremony will be fascinated by these legends, anecdotes, bits of lore andThe Japanese tea ceremony blends art with nature and has for centuries brought harmony to the daily life of its practitioners.Stories From a Tearoom Window is a timeless collection of tales of the ancient tea sages, compiled in the eighteenth century Both longtime adherents and newcomers to the tea ceremony will be fascinated by these legends, anecdotes, bits of lore and history that so aptly express the essence of tea.Many of these stories center around the lives of the great tea masters First among them is Sen no Rikyu, who perfected the tea ceremony and embodies its poise, modesty and refinement Among the famous tales recounted here are those of Rikyu s morning glory tea ceremony and of his tragic death Darker presences of the great warlords Nobunaga and Hideyoshi, who sponsored and also abused Rikyu, are manifest as well.Holding to the tea ceremony s core ideal of natural simplicity, author Shigenori Chikamatsu brings to the page stories which touch on the related arts of ceramics, poetry, Zen, calligraphy, and the origins of everyday items of Japanese life such as the cotton tabi split toed socks and the bento lunchbox Chapters include Tearooms in the Old DaysFlowers in the Tea GardenThe Origins of TeaIori s Tea ScoopFamous LacquerersThe Legacy of Rikyu s HouseThe Tea Ceremony for Warriors

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      212 Chikamatsu Monzaemon Toshiko Mori Shigenori Chikmatsu Kozaburo Mori
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      Posted by:Chikamatsu Monzaemon Toshiko Mori Shigenori Chikmatsu Kozaburo Mori
      Published :2020-05-09T08:55:11+00:00

    About “Chikamatsu Monzaemon Toshiko Mori Shigenori Chikmatsu Kozaburo Mori

    1. Chikamatsu Monzaemon Toshiko Mori Shigenori Chikmatsu Kozaburo Mori says:

      Born in Japan in 1653 with the name of Sugi Nobumori , Chikamatsu Monzaemon was to become perhaps the greatest dramatist in the history of the Japanese theatre Chikamatsu is said to have written over one hundred plays, most of which were written for the bunraku or puppet theatre His works combine comedy and tragedy, poetry and prose, and present scenes of combat, torture, and suicide on stage Most of Chikamatsu s domestic tragedies are based an actual events His Sonezaki shinju The Love Suicides at Sonezaki , for example, was based on reports of an actual double suicide of the apprentice clerk and his lover.But he wrote some famous historical plays, too.In 1705, Chikamatsu moved to Osaka where he became a writer for Takemoto Gidayu s puppet theatre and remained here until his death in 1725.



    2 thoughts on “Stories from a Tearoom Window: Lore and Legends of the Japanese Tea Ceremony

    1. I don't know why it took me so long to finish it! For the Chado practitioners who are interested and wants to visualize what Sen no Rikyu and his disciples experience when performing, learning and creating the way of tea. You can actually get a feel and an understanding of the relationship between Rikyu and his Disciples, wife, successors, and with the Lords of Japan. I wish I had finished this book before my visit to the Chado art museum in Kyoto; as many of Chadogu (tea utensils) mentioned in [...]

    2. Been using this book as a meditation tool. It is the lore and legends of the Japanese Tea Ceremony dating from the late 1600's. It was first published in 1804. The book explains how the simple act of preparing and serving tea can become an artistic and spiritual experience. A commonplace everyday existence can become the essence of aestheticism when we learn to adore the beauty, harmony and clarity in our everyday life.

    3. I really loved the style of this book. The stories, often about tools or etiquette, come in tiny snippets and I think these little notes really give you time to mull over exactly what is being said. It's an enormous wealth of information that has been packaged into bite-sized morsels, well worth savouring.

    4. This book was written just after the Sengoku Period in Japan but wasn't published until centuries later, and really, I'm not even sure it's appropriate to call it a "book" except in form. It's a number of small stories, some no more than a paragraph in length, relating to Sen no Rikyu and the practice of tea ceremony in 17th century Japan.The anecdotes have translations beneath them of certain terms, but I think this is a book that require some pre-existing knowledge of Japanese culture and of t [...]

    5. Wonderful short stories and anecdotes from a real Japanese tea master in the 17th century. Beautiful insights into the true meaning of tea, wabisabi and zen culture in Japan.

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